Little Rock, Arkansas

 In the Old State House  Photo by B. Wing

In the Old State House  Photo by B. Wing

I recently had a business trip to Little Rock in Arkansas.  I was not looking forward to it — thinking it would be a dull Southern town with lots of ‘scary people.’  My first surprise was when I landed at the airport and saw that it was named ‘Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport.’  Not ‘Bill Clinton’ or ‘Clinton’ but with both of their names.

My second surprise was on the way to the hotel, when I saw an operating streetcar.  I had no idea that there were streetcars in Little Rock. The driver said that they had been operational since 2004.   

 The brochure for the streetcar

The brochure for the streetcar

 The streetcar route through Little Rock downtown and North Little Rock's commercial area

The streetcar route through Little Rock downtown and North Little Rock’s commercial area

Needless to say, since I had a few hours free after arriving, I took advantage of the time and did a bit of sightseeing.  I first went to see the State Capitol, then Union Station and walked back to the hotel area.  There is a streetcar stop right across from the hotel.  Rode it around downtown and North Little Rock on the way to the Clinton Presidential Library. After work the next day, I went to the Old State House which was next to the Hotel and to the Arkansas Museum which is a couple of blocks away. But the most fun was that I rented a bike and rode the Arkansas River Trail. More about all of these things to follow.

First —  the trolley.  It has 3.4 miles of track in two cities: Little Rock and North Little Rock, which are separated by the Arkansas River.  (for those that may not know:  the state is pronounced locally as  ARE can saw, while the river is pronounced are CAN zass.)  The system uses two power sources for its catenary — one on each side of the river.  So if there is a power outage on one side, the entire system can still function. They have a website for the transit agency: https://rrmetro.org/about/.

The following is copied from http://www.railwaypreservation.com/vintagetrolley/littlerock.htm : “The new line provides an important circulator function between the two downtowns, linking together the area’s major attractions while encouraging tourism and enhancing economic development efforts. Phase 1 cost $19.6 million, including design, construction management, three vehicles and the maintenance building. Eighty percent of the funding came from Federal sources ranging from New Starts Rail funds, flex STP funds, and High Priority funds from TEA 21. Local funds were provided by Pulaski County, Little Rock and North Little Rock. CAT is also offering to selling naming rights for the system, cars and stations. Annual operating costs are estimated at $500,000.

Phase 1 opened inNovember 2004, connecting the two Downtowns. Phase 2 opened in February 2007 and added the half-mile extension to the Clinton Presidential Library site and two more trolleys. Phase 2 cost $7.6 million dollars. Longer range plans include a possible 3 mile extension to Little Rock National Airport. 

Equipment: The line is served by Gomaco replica trolleys, similar in appearance to the cars built for Tampa, Florida. The Little Rock cars are shorter by the length of two windows, and because of the geography of the Main St. Bridge over the Arkansas River,  are also equipped with a magnetic track brake as an additional safety feature. Three cars were purchased for operation of the initial phase, and two additional cars provided as part of the phase 2 line extension.”

Now — some of my pictures and videos of it:

 Photo by B. Wing

Photo by B. Wing

 Photo by B. Wing

Photo by B. Wing

 Fares are $1.    Photo by B. WIng

Fares are $1.    Photo by B. WIng

 Photo by B. WIng

Photo by B. WIng

 At the end station near the Clinton Presidential Library   Photo by B. Wing

At the end station near the Clinton Presidential Library   Photo by B. Wing

 

As you could see in the movie above, the streetcar crosses the river in its own lane.  There is one track, so it is used in both directions.  The view from the bridge was fantastic.  While I was there, they were demolishing the old Broadway Bridge.  The first try to bring down the bridge at 10 am (before I was there) failed.  When I rode the streetcar across its bridge in late afternoon, the Broadway bridge was still standing, but by the time I returned from the Presidential Museum, the bridge had been taken down.  High drama!

Union Station is really a misnomer.  It was only used by one railroad — the Missouri Pacific Railroad.  While being an impressive building (built in the early 1920s), it is now serving principally as an office building.  The old waiting rooms and service areas are now closed to the public.  One can’t even reach the AMTRAK waiting room from the main entrance of the building.  AMTRAK has a small waiting area in the basement — at track level that is reached from the back of the building.  It is not open most of the time, 

 The  Texas Eagle  schedule as published by AMTRAK.  Note that it leaves Little Rock westbound at 3:10 am and northbound (to Chicago) at 11:39 pm.   Not very convenient!       

The Texas Eagle schedule as published by AMTRAK.  Note that it leaves Little Rock westbound at 3:10 am and northbound (to Chicago) at 11:39 pm.   Not very convenient!       

 Union Station in Little Rock, Arkansas. Now an Office Building with a small AMTRAK area in the basement.    Photo by B. Wing

Union Station in Little Rock, Arkansas. Now an Office Building with a small AMTRAK area in the basement.    Photo by B. Wing

 The AMTRAK lounge in the basement of Union Station      Photo by B. Wing

The AMTRAK lounge in the basement of Union Station      Photo by B. Wing

There were a series of panels at Union Station with the history described.  They are presented here:

     

   

Perhaps the following sign to the AMTRAK area sums up the role of it in Little Rocik:

 Sign in Little Rock.       Photo by B. WIng

Sign in Little Rock.       Photo by B. WIng

There were a few passenger stations in Little Rock over a century ago.  One of the surviving buildings is the former Choctaw Station (Choctaw, Oklahoma and Gulf Railroad).   It is located directly across from the Clinton Presidential Library.  It serves as part of the University of Arkansas: the Clinton School of Public Service.  On its website you can take a virtual tour of the building.  http://clintonschool.uasys.edu/about/the-campus/

 The Clinton School of Public Service in a refurbished train station.        Photo by B. Wing

The Clinton School of Public Service in a refurbished train station.        Photo by B. Wing

One of the interesting features of Little Rock is that it has transformed old railroad bridges into pedestrian bridges and park areas.  One of the bridges is called Junction Bridge.  At the Little Rock side of it, there is a park with a music pavilion and nice trails.  This is the location of the original ‘Little Rock’  on the shore that the city was named after.  A history of the city which includes how the city got its name is available at http://www.littlerock.com/famous/history/. Junction Bridge is where I took videos of the streetcar crossing the river on the next bridge upriver.  It’s a perfect vantage point.  According to the state’s website: “It was constructed originally in 1899 by the Choctaw and Memphis Railroad and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad. It carried trains across the Arkansas River until 1984 when its active railroad use ended.”

North Little Rock’s rail yard still plays an important part in the Union Pacific network. The Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department produced a document in 2013 that summarized the state of railroads in Arkansas.  While Arkansas has never been central to American railroad history, there have been several companies operating in the state.  

 From the Arkansas State Government

From the Arkansas State Government

 Junction Bridge   You climb up to the elevated portion or take an elevator up.     Photo by B. Wing

Junction Bridge   You climb up to the elevated portion or take an elevator up.     Photo by B. Wing

 From the elevated portion of the Junction Bridge looking down.    Photo by B. WIng

From the elevated portion of the Junction Bridge looking down.    Photo by B. WIng

 On the main level of Junction Bridge     Photo by B. Wing

On the main level of Junction Bridge     Photo by B. Wing

There is another former railroad bridge in the downtown area.  It is located right next to the Bill Clinton Presidential Library.  It has two names:  the Clinton Presidential Park Bridge and informally, the Rock Island Bridge, named after the last railroad to use it. This bridge is designed so that  bicyclists and pedestrians don’t have to climb stairs or use an elevator.  There is a suspended ramp on the bridge.  This is very welcome, as I found out when I rented a bike and rode the Arkansas River Trail which crosses the river on it.  

 The Rock Island Bridge as seen from the Clinton Presidential Library     Photo by B. Wing

The Rock Island Bridge as seen from the Clinton Presidential Library     Photo by B. Wing

The Presidential Library is built on the grounds of a former Rock Island rail yard.  It is within easy distance of downtown, and is served by the Metro streetcar.   I found the presentations inside to be interesting and relevant — particularly during this election cycle. I would recommend visitors to go and see it.

 From the brochure.  Note the rail bridge (now for pedestrian use) on the left.

From the brochure.  Note the rail bridge (now for pedestrian use) on the left.

 Each year has a separate exhibit.  There are also theme focused exhibits.     Photo by B. Wing

Each year has a separate exhibit.  There are also theme focused exhibits.     Photo by B. Wing

 

Bill Clinton was the Governor of Arkansas before becoming President.  He therefore spent a lot of time at the Arkansas State Capitol.  Here are some photos of it:

 Arkansas Capitol     Photo by B. Wing

Arkansas Capitol     Photo by B. Wing

 Inside the Capitol   Photo by B. Wing

Inside the Capitol   Photo by B. Wing

 Clinton's portrait in the Arkansas Capitol Building         Photo by B. WIng

Clinton’s portrait in the Arkansas Capitol Building         Photo by B. WIng

Bill Clinton accepted the results of the election for President from the balcony of the Old State House in downtown Little Rock.  This was the original state capitol and is built in Greek Revival style.

 Old State House   Photo by B. Wing

Old State House   Photo by B. Wing

 From Getty Images

From Getty Images

Little Rock has a place in American history for the intense resistance to the Civil Rights Movement that occurred there.  The webpage maintained by the city states:

“Little Rock was thrust into the national and international spotlight in September 1957 when Little Rock Central High School became the site of the first important test of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. The ruling held racial segregation in public schools to be unconstitutional.

Nine black students, known as the “Little Rock Nine,” made Civil Rights history when, under protection of the 101st Airborne Division of the U.S. Army by orders from President Dwight D. Eisenhower, they entered Little Rock Central High School. Eisenhower’s orders came after Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus, citing safety concerns, had earlier called out the National Guard to prevent the students from entering.”

 A statue on the grounds of the state Capitol of the children attempting to attend Central High School in 1957.    Photo by B. Wing

A statue on the grounds of the state Capitol of the children attempting to attend Central High School in 1957.    Photo by B. Wing

Another incident is recalled by a simple plaque.

 A plaque in downtown Little Rock.     Photo by B. WIng

A plaque in downtown Little Rock.     Photo by B. WIng

If you are interested in finding out more about Arkansas, there is an interesting museum there.  It’s called the Historic Arkansas Museum.  It is located downtown.  On its grounds are several dwellings that were moved from other portions of the state, as well as an exhibit hall.  It has an excellent section on the Indian culture of the area.  

 Part of the museum's exhibit on the native people of the Arkansas region.       Photo by B. Wing

Part of the museum’s exhibit on the native people of the Arkansas region.       Photo by B. Wing

 Part of a homestead that was brought to the Museum       Photo by B. Wing

Part of a homestead that was brought to the Museum       Photo by B. Wing

Talk about surprises!  I had no idea that Little Rock was home to Korean Martial Arts in the US!  

 A plaque in near a Korean arch in downtown Little Rock.  Behind it is a tranquil Korean style garden.     Photo by B. WIng

A plaque in near a Korean arch in downtown Little Rock.  Behind it is a tranquil Korean style garden.     Photo by B. WIng

 The Korean Arch           Photo by B. WIng

The Korean Arch           Photo by B. WIng

One last thing:  As I mentioned, I rented a bike and rode on the River Trail.  It was fantastic!  It doesn’t take long to get out of town and ride through parks and along parts of the river with no buildings visible.  Most of the trail is great — particularly on the North Little Rock side.  Coming back on the Little Rock side, parts of the journey are on sidewalks or in the road.  Along the way, one sees the Clinton Library, a submarine made into a museum , an abandoned quarry, beautiful riverscape, and you can ride on a pedestrian/ bicycle only bridge across the Big Dam Bridge (I did not make that name up!).  

 The park where I started riding -- in downtown right near the Junction Bridge       Photo by B. WIng

The park where I started riding — in downtown right near the Junction Bridge       Photo by B. WIng

 The USS Razorback -- which you can visit     Photo by B. WIng

The USS Razorback — which you can visit     Photo by B. WIng

 On the trail               Photo by B. WIng

On the trail               Photo by B. WIng

 The Big Dam Bridge .  It is a dam with a hydroelectric station.     Photo by B. Wing

The Big Dam Bridge .  It is a dam with a hydroelectric station.     Photo by B. Wing

 A rather exclusive office building in downtown Little Rock.     Photo by B. WIng

A rather exclusive office building in downtown Little Rock.     Photo by B. WIng

 

I was only in Little Rock for a day and a half — of which I had to work for most of the full day.  It’s a small city (about 200,000 people). I didn’t get to see the residential areas, so I have no idea about what it would be to live there. But as a tourist, it definitely has enough there to see.  It’s compact, which is why I was able to get so many photos and see so many things.  This is another instance of me being surprised about what a city off the beaten path has to offer (see the blog CINCY!).  

 

 

1 Comment

  1. Mike Smith says:

    Very interesting and informative article, Brad. I certainly didn’t know Little Rock had a streetcar system.

    Like

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